Looking for a Lighthouse

Happy New Year all and I truly hope you all enjoyed a terrific festive period.

As a little weekend treat, I decided to pick myself up a copy of the ‘net’ magazine, mainly due to the included feature articles on which web development and design tools are ‘en-flique’ (that one is for Claire; a trip to the urban dictionary is in order) for 2018. There are also some amazing looking articles discussing things like colour palette choices, and tools that assist in creating them, which should prove handy as I will be looking to potentially change up the Frog & Pencil website a little as I craft a fully functional CMS this year; something that has been well overdue.

As a quick aside, I’ve decided to check out Google’s own automated page analysis tool, Lighthouse. This can run performance and accessibility analysis on public or password protected sites. Information for getting started can be found here.

I’m opting to run this within Chrome development tools, but you can run this from the command line or as a Node module if you prefer (which allows you to hook this into a continuous integration setup, which could be incredibly useful).

Up to this point, I have been using YSlow as a web page dissection tool, but I’m happy to bust out an alternative to keep things interesting.

So, what kind of feedback does the tool provide and how does it present it? I’ll run this against the Frog & Pencil homepage and show you the results (no matter how bad they turn out, I’ll be honest!). When using Chrome you just need to inspect the audits tab, within Chrome development tools (accessed via F12 or Ctrl+Shift+I, on windows), to get up and running as follows:

Lighthouse via the Audits Tab.

Audits Tab.

On clicking ‘Perform an audit…’ you be presented with options as below (I’ll leave them all checked for this particular test run):

Audit Options for Lighthouse.

Audit Options.

The report is, on first inspection, very detailed and, as you can see, I have a fair bit of work to do (although I’m happy with the accessibility rating at least). The report is downloadable using the highlighted button:

Lighthouse Report Header.

Lighthouse Report Header.

The tests performed also appear to be more strict that the YSlow V2 test, which is nice to see:

YSlow V2 Test.

YSlow V2 Test.

There have been some surprising opportunities for improvement highlighted. I’ve long known that I should switch out the entire site to run over https and when the site is overhauled I intend to make better use of bundling for static files and will consider the use of a CDN. I have plenty of work to do with image compression also.

Here are a few things that really caught my attention:

1) How poor the site ran under simulated 3G speeds:

Simulated 3G Speeds

Simulated 3G Speeds.

2) The scale of the improvements still to be made by reducing render blocking scripts/stylesheets (a boo boo that I should really be covering) and image management:

Performance Improvement Opportunities.

Performance Improvement Opportunities.

3) The report highlighted that I was using libraries with known vulnerabilities and that I have left in code that was writing errors to the console (doh!):

Third Party Libraries.

Third Party Libraries.

This does bring into focus the core need of revisiting the website this year and giving it a thorough tune-up, as opportunities towards the end of last year were at a premium. All in all, if you’ve not used Lighthouse yet I would suggest giving it a look; especially as it takes seconds to run. I’ll be working my way through the highlighted areas in the report in the meantime!

All the best 😉

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